Use Cases Process Control & Optimization

Process Control & Optimization

Process control and optimization (PCO) is the discipline of adjusting a process to maintain or optimize a specified set of parameters without violating process constraints. The PCO market is being driven by rising demand for energy-efficient production processes, safety and security concerns, and the development of IoT systems that can reliably predict process deviations. Fundamentally, there are three parameters that can be adjusted to affect optimal performance. - Equipment optimization: The first step is to verify that the existing equipment is being used to its fullest advantage by examining operating data to identify equipment bottlenecks. - Operating procedures: Operating procedures may vary widely from person-to-person or from shift-to-shift. Automation of the plant can help significantly. But automation will be of no help if the operators take control and run the plant in manual. - Control optimization: In a typical processing plant, such as a chemical plant or oil refinery, there are hundreds or even thousands of control loops. Each control loop is responsible for controlling one part of the process, such as maintaining a temperature, level, or flow. If the control loop is not properly designed and tuned, the process runs below its optimum. The process will be more expensive to operate, and equipment will wear out prematurely. For each control loop to run optimally, identification of sensor, valve, and tuning problems is important. It has been well documented that over 35% of control loops typically have problems. The process of continuously monitoring and optimizing the entire plant is sometimes called performance supervision.
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IIC Smart Airline Baggage Management Testbed
IIC Smart Airline Baggage Management Testbed
Unlike the airline reservation systems with a limited number of global providers like Amadeus, Travelport, Sabre and Share, the ecosystem around the airports and airlines is heavily fragmented. There are no centralized systems that can unify all its stakeholders’ data such as: • Airline • Passengers • Airport vendors like baggage handling companies, fuel and catering providers • Airport tenant (shops, malls etc.) • Parking and ground transportation • Security (TSA) & Regulatory bodies Many luggage tracking systems at the moment are simply isolated mobile smartphone applications tied into a proprietary third-party web application using such things as Bluetooth baggage tags. The challenge that the Smart Airline Baggage Management testbed is addressing is bringing together and integrating disparate and isolated airline enterprise applications and systems into a single solution to better handle smart baggage across the airline and aviation ecosystems. GOALS The Smart Airline Baggage Management testbed, part of a broader aviation ecosystem vision, is aimed at reducing the instances of delayed, damaged and lost bags leading to lower economic risk exposure to the airlines; increasing the ability to track and report on baggage including location and weight changes to prevent theft and loss; and improve customer satisfaction through better communication including offering new value-added services to frequent flyers. The testbed is also aimed at helping airlines address the new baggage handling requirements set out by IATA in Resolution 753 requiring airlines to implement more comprehensive acquisition and delivery solutions for baggage tracking and handling by June 2018. This target is also outlined in the broader IATA 2015 White Paper titled “Simplifying the Business.”
Samsonite Track&Go
Samsonite Track&Go
Travellers spend their lives discovering new places and meeting new people from all around the world. It can be such a wonderful experience, but sometimes it can turn into a disaster when your luggage gets lost. In 2014 alone, more than 24 million pieces of baggage were lost. Fortunately, 95% of them were found and returned to their owners. However, that leaves more than 1 million items of baggage that have never been recovered.
Driving Cost Savings with Remote Water Management
Driving Cost Savings with Remote Water Management
With recent population growth and aging infrastructure are pressing municipalities to raise water rates between five to 11 percent a year, driving commercial and agricultural customers to consider more efficient water use and promote sustainable practices. Hence, the need for better remote water management is at an all-time high.

The advanced process control market is estimated to reach USD 1.4 billion by 2020; growing at a CAGR of 11.79% from 2014 to 2020.

Source: Markets and Markets

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