Accelerating the Industrial Internet of Things
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Use Cases Factory Operations Visibility & Intelligence

Factory Operations Visibility & Intelligence

Visualizing factory operations data is a challenge for many manufacturers today. One of the IIoT initiatives some manufacturers are pursuing today is providing real-time visibility in factory operations and the health of machines. The goal is to improve manufacturing efficiency. The challenge is in combining and correlating diverse data sources that greatly vary in nature, origin, and life cycle.

Factory Operations Visibility and Intelligence (FOVI) is designed to collect sensor data generated on the factory floor, production-equipment logs, production plans and statistics, operator information, and to integrate all this and other related information in the cloud. In this way, it can be used to bring visibility to production facilities, analyze and predict outcomes, and support better decisions for improvements.

 

 

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Boeing Cuts Production Time by 25% with Skylight on Glass
Boeing Cuts Production Time by 25% with Skylight on Glass
130 miles of wiring go into every new Boeing 747-8 Freighter, tucked away overhead and underfoot from the cockpit to the wheel wells.Every Boeing aircraft, from the workhorse 737 to the new 787 Dreamliner, has multiple configurations, each with its own wiring scheme. In past years, technicians used “phone books” full of diagrams to do their work. Even with laptops, the same basic problem arised: constant look-away interruptions as workers got directions and cross-checked diagrams and schematics.
IIC - Smart Factory Web Testbed
IIC - Smart Factory Web Testbed
The Smart Factory Web aims to form a network of smart factories with flexible adaptation of production capabilities and sharing of resources and assets to improve order fulfillment. Key questions are: How can we connect factories to the Smart Factory Web and exchange data reliably? How can we provide the information securely at the right granularity to authorized partners? How can production capabilities be adapted quickly and efficiently in response to orders?
Refrigeration Plant in Climatic Wind Tunnel
Refrigeration Plant in Climatic Wind Tunnel
Johnson Controls has advised Jaguar Land Rover on matters relating to the service, maintenance and repair of the Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration (HVAC&R) systems installed at the Gaydon Centre for almost 20 years. In 2012 we were invited to submit a proposal for replacement of the evaporator installed in the Climatic Wind Tunnel. In a ‘Site Survey Report’ submitted to Jaguar Land Rover, we drew their attention to the key factors that we believed were behind the evaporator’s less then optimum level of performance. The bulk of these stemmed from the fact that the existing evaporator was over 20 years old and throughout its working life a number of design changes had been made to the overall system that it formed a part of, thus rendering it no longer fit for purpose. Examples of such key factors included: • The old evaporator’s level of performance was now too ‘industrial’. It was capable of operating within a temperature range of -40°C and +55°C, while projected requirements were for a temperature range of between -10°C and +50°C. • Our concerns were raised over the suitability of the existing heat transfer fluid being used, which was proving to be highly corrosive. • The old evaporator was still operating on the soon to be banned R22 refrigerant. The use of all HCFCs for the service and maintenance of HVAC&R systems will become a criminal offence from 1st January 2015.

The industrial control and factory automation market are expected to reach USD 269.5 billion by 2024 from USD 160.0 billion in 2018, at a CAGR of 9.08%.

Source: markets and markets

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