Organizations
    ANDOR
  • (2)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
  • (1)
    ANDOR
  • (10)
  • (1)
  • (11)
11 organizations
Organization missing? Just let us know via Add New Organization.
Dynamic Spectrum Alliance (DSA)
Dynamic Spectrum Alliance (DSA)
United States | Non-Governmental Organization (NGO)
The Dynamic Spectrum Alliance (DSA) is a global, cross-industry, not for profit organization advocating for laws, regulations, and economic best practices that will lead to more efficient utilization of spectrum and foster innovation and affordable connectivity for all.DSA is the only global organization focused on promoting spectrum sharing innovation to get the most out of wireless resources. Our team is made up of worldwide technology experts, making the DSA the shared spectrum go-to organization for regulators and policymakers all over the world.
European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI)
European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI)
France | Non-Governmental Organization (NGO)
The European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) is an independent, not-for-profit, standardization organization in the telecommunications industry (equipment makers and network operators) in Europe. ETSI produces globally-applicable standards for Information and Communications Technologies (ICT), including fixed, mobile, radio, converged, broadcast and internet technologies.We have a special role in Europe. This includes supporting European regulations and legislation through the creation of Harmonised European Standards. Only standards developed by the three ESOs (CEN, CENELEC and ETSI) are recognized as European Standards (ENs).We produce different types of standards to meet the different needs of business and society. These needs include:- facilitating trade- enabling economies and efficiencies- achieving interoperability- enhancing consumer protection and confidenceThe progress of innovation requires a balance between collaboration and competition. Standards provide a foundation to achieve this balance and help enable new technologies. We therefore maintain close links with the R&D community and academia and we support the development of new technologies through a variety of mechanisms.
Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC)
Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC)
United States | Non-Governmental Organization (NGO)
The Industrial Internet Consortium was founded in March 2014 to bring together the organizations and technologies necessary to accelerate the growth of the industrial internet by identifying, assembling, testing and promoting best practices. Members work collaboratively to speed the commercial use of advanced technologies. Membership includes small and large technology innovators, vertical market leaders, researchers, universities and government organizations.Through multiple activities and programs, the Industrial Internet Consortium helps technology users, vendors, system integrators and researchers achieve tangible results as they seek to digitally transform across the enterprise. The resources of the Industrial Internet Consortium – developed collaboratively over the years by industry experts from around the globe and across all industries – give organizations the guidance needed to strategically apply digital technologies and achieve digital transformation.
Near Field Communication Forum (NFC)
Near Field Communication Forum (NFC)
United States | Non-Governmental Organization (NGO)
The NFC Forum is a non-profit industry association whose membership draws from all parts of the NFC ecosystem. Working within the framework of the NFC Forum, member organizations share development, application, and marketing expertise to develop the best possible solutions for advancing the use of Near Field Communication, enhancing the lives of consumers worldwide and advancing members’ business objectives.Near field communication, abbreviated NFC, is a form of contactless communication between devices like smartphones or tablets. Contactless communication allows a user to wave the smartphone over a NFC compatible device to send information without needing to touch the devices together or go through multiple steps setting up a connection.Near Field Communication utilizes electromagnetic radio fields while technologies such as Bluetooth and Wi-Fi focus on radio transmissions instead.Bluetooth. Radio-frequency identification. QR codes. The modern world is ever expanding and with it comes new technologies that change the way we communicate and interact with each other.Who benefits from near field communication?- Busy moms checking out at the grocery store- Businessmen and women riding the subway to work- Businesses looking for faster, more secure payment methods for customers- Students touring a museum- And many moreNear field communication (NFC) technology lets smartphones and other enabled devices communicate with other devices containing a NFC tag. Whether swiping your smartphone at the checkout lane in the grocery store, waving it over a display at a local museum, or bumping phones with a friend to share the latest games, near field technology lets you pay, play, and learn easily.
OASIS Consortium (OASIS)
OASIS Consortium (OASIS)
United States | Non-Governmental Organization (NGO)
OASIS is a nonprofit consortium that drives the development, convergence and adoption of open standards for the global information society.OASIS promotes industry consensus and produces worldwide standards for security, Internet of Things, cloud computing, energy, content technologies, emergency management, and other areas. OASIS open standards offer the potential to lower cost, stimulate innovation, grow global markets, and protect the right of free choice of technology.OASIS members broadly represent the marketplace of public and private sector technology leaders, users and influencers. The consortium has more than 5,000 participants representing over 600 organizations and individual members in more than 65 countries.OASIS is distinguished by its transparent governance and operating procedures. Members themselves set the OASIS technical agenda, using a lightweight process expressly designed to promote industry consensus and unite disparate efforts. Completed work is ratified by open ballot. Governance is accountable and unrestricted. OASIS was founded under the name "SGML Open" in 1993. It began as a consortium of vendors and users devoted to developing guidelines for interoperability among products that support the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML). The consortium changed its name to "OASIS" (Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards) in 1998 to reflect an expanded scope of technical work.
Object Management Group (OMG)
Object Management Group (OMG)
United States | Non-Governmental Organization (NGO)
Object Management Group (OMG) is international, open membership, not-for-profit technology standards consortium. OMG standards are driven by vendors, end-users, academic institutions and government agencies. OMG Task Forces develop enterprise integration standards for a wide range of technologies and an even wider range of industries. OMG’s modeling standards, including the Unified Modeling Language? (UML?) and Model Driven Architecture? (MDA?), enable powerful visual design, execution and maintenance of software and other processes. OMG also hosts organizations such as the user-driven information-sharing Cloud Standards Customer Council? (CSCC?) and the IT industry software quality standardization group, the Consortium for IT Software Quality? (CISQ?). OMG also manages the Industrial Internet Consortium, the public-private partnership that was formed in 2014 with AT&T, Cisco, GE, IBM, and Intel to forward the development, adoption, and innovation of the Industrial IoT.Our members include hundreds of organizations including software end-users in over two dozen vertical markets (from finance to healthcare and automotive to insurance) and virtually every large organization in the technology industry. OMG’s one organization- one vote policy ensures that every member organization- whether large or small- has an effective voice in our voting process. At OMG, specification adoption is the starting point rather than the end of the process. Our “No Shelf-ware” policy bars all proposed specifications that do not have an implementation plan from being adopted by OMG. This guarantees that all OMG specifications are immediately useable. Furthermore, we do not just focus on the specification itself - we focus on the whole product: with corresponding seminars, workshops, certification, books and more! OMG hosts four technical meetings throughout the year. These meetings give OMG members and interested nonmembers the opportunity to collaborate in a centralized location, learn about technology standards products and processes at tutorials, and attend special information day events on current trending hot topics. While technical meetings provide a centralized location for Task Forces and Working Groups to work together, they are merely checkpoints with the bulk of the work between members taking place electronically via email, teleconferences, and on wikis.In addition to technical meetings, OMG acts as event producer for conferences and workshops for its members around the world, including the Internationalization & Unicode Conference.OMG maintains liaison relationships with dozens of other organizations including ISO (which publishes many OMG standards without edits), Health Level Seven (HL7), and the Data Transparency Coalition.
Open Connectivity Foundation
Open Connectivity Foundation
United States | Non-Governmental Organization (NGO)
Billions of connected devices (devices, phones, computers and sensors) should be able to communicate with one another regardless of manufacturer, operating system, chipset or physical transport. The Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) is creating a specification and sponsoring an open source project to make this possible. WHAT ARE WE DOING?- Defining the specification, certification & branding to deliver reliable interoperability -- a connectivity framework that abstracts complexity- Our open specification allows anyone to implement and it is easy for developers to use- It includes predictable IP protection & branding for certified devices (via compliance testing) and service-level interoperability- There is also an Open Source implementation of our specification - IoTivity Project- This Open Source implementation is designed to enable application developers and device manufacturers to deliver interoperable products across Android, iOS, Windows, Linux, Tizen, and more.WHY ARE WE DOING THIS?- We want to connect the next 25 billion devices for the Internet of Things.- We want to provide secure and reliable device discovery and connectivity across multiple OSs and platforms.- There are multiple proposals and forums driving different approaches... but no single solution addresses the majority of key requirements.- To get industry consolidation around a common, interoperable approach.- To build a broad industry consortium of companies to create a scalable solution.WHO NEEDS THIS?- Consumers, Enterprise, Industrial, Automotive, Health, etc. who want smart devices to easily interconnect and communicate with appliances, embedded devices, etc.- Developers of operating systems, platforms, and applications who want their products to interoperate seamlessly across many brands and ecosystems.- End users who want consistent levels of security and identity across smart devices down to the smallest connected appliance
Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)
Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)
United States | Non-Governmental Organization (NGO)
The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), an international voluntary consensus standards organization, originated in 1994. In the OGC, more than 500 commercial, governmental, nonprofit and research organizations worldwide collaborate in a consensus process encouraging development and implementation of open standards for geospatial content and services, GIS data processing and data sharing.OGC standards are used in a wide variety of domains including Environment, Defense, Health, Agriculture, Meteorology, Sustainable Development and many more.Our members come from government, commercial organizations, NGOs, academic and research organizations.
Open Mobile Alliance (OMA)
Open Mobile Alliance (OMA)
United States | Non-Governmental Organization (NGO)
OMA was formed by the world’s leading mobile operators, device and network suppliers, information technology companies and content providers as the industry focal point for the development of mobile service enabler specifications. OMA is a non-profit organization that delivers open specifications for creating interoperable services that work across all geographical boundaries, on any bearer network. OMA’s specifications support the billions of new and existing terminals across a variety of wireless networks, including traditional cellular operator networks and emerging networks supporting machine-to-machine device communications for the Internet of Things (IoT).Significant new work in OMA is leading to the development of next generation mobile services in areas such as Device Management, LBS, IoT, APIs and more.Goals of OMA:- Deliver high quality, open technical specifications based upon market requirements that drive modularity, extensibility, and consistency amongst enablers to reduce industry implementation efforts.- Ensure OMA service enabler specifications provide interoperability across different devices, geographies, service providers, operators, and networks; facilitate interoperability of the resulting product implementations.- Be the catalyst for the consolidation of standards activity within the mobile data service industry; working in conjunction with other existing standards organizations and industry fora to improve interoperability and decrease operational costs for all involved.- Provide value and benefits to members in OMA from all parts of the value chain including content and service providers, information technology providers, mobile operators and wireless vendors such that they elect to actively participate in the organization.
Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA)
Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA)
United States | Non-Governmental Organization (NGO)
Poised at the intersection of the network and communications technologies, the Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) brings together communities of interest across  -- Technology, Government Affairs, Standards, and Business Performance -- to shape solutions, facilitate programs, and provide products and services that enable high-speed networks and accelerate next-generation Information and Communications Technology (ICT) innovation across all markets.With a global membership of more than 400-member companies TIA is at the center of a vibrant ecosystem of companies delivering technologies and services that is revolutionizing the way the world communicates. Our members include ICT manufacturers and suppliers, network operators and service enablers, distributors and system integrators.
The Linux Foundation
The Linux Foundation
United States | Non-Governmental Organization (NGO)
The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company.The Linux Foundation hosts projects spanning enterprise IT, embedded systems, consumer electronics, cloud, networking, and industry domains. Some projects have been around for decades; others are on the leading edge of technology, such as Hyperledger (blockchain) and Dronecode (unmanned vehicles).
test test