Use Cases Digital Twin

Digital Twin

A digital twin works as a bridge to connect the physical and the virtual world for a process, product or service. It is a digital replica of a living or non-living physical entity. With the development of IoT, a digital twin can constantly accumulate data and mutually transfer the information with the physical body during the life cycle of the system.

The object of the digital twin is to analyze data and monitor systems in order to head off problems before they occur, prevent downtime, develop new opportunities and even plan for the future.

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Leveraging the IoT to Gain a Competitive Edge in International Competition
Leveraging the IoT to Gain a Competitive Edge in International Competition
Many large manufacturers in and outside Japan are competing for larger market share in the same space, expecting a growing demand for projectors in the areas of entertainment, which requires glamor and strong visual performance as well as digital signage that can attract people’s attention. “It is becoming more and more difficult to differentiate ourselves with stand-alone hardware products,” says Kazuyuki Kitagawa, Director of Service & Support at Panasonic AVC Networks. “In order for Panasonic to grow market share and overall business, it is essential for us to develop solutions that deliver significant added value.” Panasonic believes projection failure and quality deterioration should never happen. This is what and has driven them to make their projectors IoT-enabled. More specifically, Panasonic has developed a system that collects data from projectors, visualizes detailed operational statuses, and predicts issues and address them before failure occurs. Their projectors are embedded with a variety of sensors that measure power supply, voltage, video input/ output signals, intake/exhaust air temperatures, cooling fan operations, and light bulb operating time. These sensors have been used to make the projector more intelligent, automatically suspending operation when the temperature rises excessively, and automatically switching light bulbs. Although this was a great first step, Panasonic projectors were still not equipped with any capability to send the data over a network.
ThyssenKrupp employs Visual Rules BRM
ThyssenKrupp employs Visual Rules BRM
ThyssenKrupp Steel Europe found itself in the position of needing to replace, step by step, the models it had programmed itself to manage the production of various grades of steel with a solution equipped to face the demands of the future. The solution had to be easy to integrate and designed to be rolled out step by step. ThyssenKrupp Steel Europe uses its automation systems to manage the whole production process at its company steel plants. This is done using clever algorithms that map the functional relationships across all stages of the steel production process. However, there are still a host of other changeable factors that influence the quality of the product obtained, and these also need to be factored in in the form of rules or formulae. What ThyssenKrupp Steel Europe was looking for was a suitable piece of software to fulfill this rule-based management function.
K-Engine's On-site Design & Cost Estimation Benefits Using AR
In the housing industry, around 60,000 small to midsize housing builders are creating images and calculating the estimated cost of each project based on the requirements of home owners. Due to the huge selection of products and options, it usually takes around one week and cost for users to create images using CAD tools in addition to picking out products from multiple vendor product catalogs.
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